Welcoming Fictionalization into Experience: 5 Questions for Nan Cuba

“Authors like Chekhov, Austen, Mansfield, Dickens, Faulkner never studied writing in an academic program. Nobel Laureate Doris Lessing quit school at the age of thirteen. These masters learned craft by analyzing the work of celebrated authors. My advice is to read widely like they did, and notice craft features: word choice, a sentence’s musical replication of a character’s action, the convincing accuracy of an idiosyncratic voice, the tension and pacing of a scene, the symbiotic nature of the story’s elements. When you love something you’ve read, figure out why.” -Nan Cuba

Read More »

Meet the Editors: Wendy Wong (Ballantine/Penguin Random House)

“I’m looking for authors with a distinctive, compelling voice; a surprising and evocative story with engaging characters; and a unique perspective, whether that’s in fiction or nonfiction. This should be someone who understands the importance of collaboration in this process, accepting that their book may take on a different form, but being open to that direction and guidance.”  -Wendy Wong, Ballantine/Penguin Press

Read More »

Meet the Agents: Victoria Dillman (Howland Literary)

“Remember that, ultimately, this is your book and your vision. Of course, listen to the opinions of those around you but know that you have the final say and you know your work and what it’s trying to accomplish best.”  -Victoria Dillman, Howland Literary

Read More »

Working with Memory in Memoir: 5 Questions for Rachel Starnes

“I’m hoping what people come away with this time is a bit of grace and forgiveness for how complicated memory really is, and how clever our brains can be with telling us we’ve got the whole truth, when what we’ve got is really a fraction that changes shape. We’re conditioned in this culture to believe that facts will reveal the ‘Truth,’ but I think where memoir really gets interesting is where it allows for slippage, makes room for other interpretations, and invites the reader into the struggle of making meaning from experience rather than telling us the ‘One Right Way’ to see what happened.” -Rachel Starnes

Read More »

Meet the Agents: Stefanie Molina (Ladderbird Literary Agency)

“Find your ‘why’–that doesn’t have to do with getting published. This is what will keep you going when you inevitably receive rejections and other blows to confidence. If getting published is your main motivator for writing, it becomes easy to give up when it seems like things aren’t working out. Go back to why you started writing in the first place and find your motivation there. Internally, recognize why your writing is worth something to you, even if you don’t get a deal.”  -Stefanie Molina, Ladderbird Literary Agency

Read More »
Search Scribe By Category
Archives
WLT TWEETS
Email Subscription